Facts & Milestones

Facts

  • > 60,000 ethnically and HLA-diverse stem cell units available for stem cell transplants and cellular therapies
  • > 5,900 cord blood units used in the treatment of patients in 41 countries on 6 continents
  • > 10,000 fully processed and cryopreserved units available for research uses to academic, institutional and commercial organizations
  • > 2,000 unprocessed fresh cord blood units distributed for research each year
  • > 100,000 mothers who have donated their baby’s cord blood
  • FDA-approved, high throughput, cGMP lab environment purpose-built in Long Island City, NY
  • Established best practices in human stem cell manufacturing, later adopted for regulatory purposes by the FDA, FACT (Foundation for Accreditation of Cell Therapy) and the NY State Department of Health

Milestones

  • 2017 – One of the very first cord blood donations ever collected, in 1993, is used for transplant in a patient, after over 23 years of storage in liquid nitrogen at our bank
  • 2016 – Program Director Dr. Pablo Rubinstein receives the ASBMT Public Service Award and the AABB Dale A. Smith Memorial Award of the National Blood Foundation
  • 2014 – NCBP is awarded the prestigious Prix Galien for “Best Biotechnology Product”
  • 2013 – We celebrate the 20th anniversary of the first transplant of cord blood stem cells in an unrelated patient, using a unit from our bank. This same year we reach 5,000 cord blood units shipped to patients during in our history
  • 2011 – In January, we submit a Biologics Licensure Application (BLA) for Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells, Cord Blood. On November 10th, the FDA licenses our product HEMACORD®, the first time the FDA has ever licensed a human stem cell product
  • 2010 – Our new WebSearch application is completed, allowing direct, web-based, two-way communication with transplant centers worldwide for requests and responses regarding cord blood units available in our bank
  • 2009 – We move our processing and quality control laboratories, and our medical and administrative offices to a new, state-of-the-art, cGMP facility in Long Island City, New York
  • 2006 – The U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) approves our participation in helping build the National Cord Blood Inventory
  • 2006 – Automated processing of cord blood units commences on the AutoXpress (AXP) platform, a system we helped design and develop. Its advanced methods allow for functionally closed processing, and greater consistency and quality of product
  • 2005 – President Bush signs the Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act of 2005, authorizing $79 million in federal funding to establish a network of public cord blood banks meeting the highest collection and preservation standards, and to create a national inventory of 150,000 ethnically diverse, high-quality cord blood samples
  • 2003 – After more than a year of working closely with our partners and legislators, The Cord Blood Stem Cell Act of 2003 is drafted, receiving considerable support from both Houses of Congress and a $10 million appropriation to jump-start the legislation
  • 2003 – NCBP becomes the first cord blood bank to be certified for compliance with NetCord-FACT (Foundation for Accreditation of Cell Therapy) standards
  • 2001 – We provide the first patient outcome data to the FDA docket, helping it develop guidelines for the licensure of cord blood banking for clinical transplantation
  • 1999 – Our 1,000th patient receives a transplant using stem cells from our bank
  • 1999 – Our collaboration with ThermoGenesis begins to design and implement automated freezing and storage techniques employing robotic freezers
  • 1998 – New England Journal of Medicine publishes results from our first 562 transplant recipients. The study supports the value of cord blood as a source of for hematopoietic stem cell transplant, whose effectiveness in transplants depends, in part, on the cell dose and degree of matching for HLA antigens between the patient and the cord blood unit
  • 1996 – The FDA grants NCBP the first Investigational New Drug (IND) exemption to collect, process, store and provide cord blood as a stem cell source in clinical transplantation
  • 1995 – We develop a new process to reduce the volume of cord blood units with minimal loss of hematopoietic cells, allowing more than a five-fold reduction in storage space and making the development of large inventories feasible
  • 1993 – We provide the first two cord blood units to ever be used for transplant in an unrelated patient
  • 1992 – Our Program is founded with a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
  • 1989 – Drs. Pablo Rubinstein and Cladd E. Stevens of the New York Blood Center present the original concept of public cord blood banking